Archive for the art Category

Reduce, Reuse – ReSpace: Habitat’s “LightWall Pavilion” To Be Sold at Auction

Posted in architecture, art, design, DIY, environment, North Carolina, raleigh with tags , , , , , , , on May 15, 2013 by killahfunkadelic

LWPavilion1_sm

Online bids are now being accepted on the “LightWall Pavilion,” the Grand Prize winner of the inaugural ReSpace Design Competition made entirely of salvaged materials. The Competition was sponsored by Habitat for Humanity of Wake County, the American Institute of Architects’ Triangle section, and Architecture For Humanity’s Raleigh chapter. All proceeds will benefit Habitat Wake.

On Saturday, June 1, from 9-11 a.m., AuctionFirst, the real estate bidding agency for the “LightWall,” will host a Preview Tour in the parking lot of Habitat Wake County’s ReStore’s parking lot at 2420 N. Raleigh Boulevard, Raleigh, NC 27604, where the pavilion is stored.

Scott Hefner and Abe Drechsler, two NCSU students studying Environmental Design in Architecture, designed the pavilion, which measures 18.5 feet long, 11.5 feet wide, and 11 feet tall, and is destined for a variety of uses – from a gazebo-like structure in the landscape, to an artist’s or writer’s studio, a playhouse, a meditation retreat, etc.

Materials, donated or salvaged from around Wake County, include:

  • Framing lumber salvaged by Habitat Wake’s DeConstruction program
  • Interior Maple gym flooring from Chapel Hill High School
  • Diagonal floor sheathing for exterior siding from the DeConstruction program, and manufactured siding donated to the Habitat ReStore in Raleigh
  • Weather barrier and roofing donated to the Raleigh ReStore
  • Old pallet racking from the Raleigh ReStore and reused glass bottles from various bars and restaurants in downtown Raleigh. The bottles create the “light wall” that filters sunlight and bathes the interior in colored light.

LWPavilion2_sm

Joel Lubell, a builder and volunteer at Habitat, conceived of and organized the ReSpace Competition “to raise awareness of reuse materials while showcasing creative and successful small space designs inspired by their use,” according to his website www.respace.org. Lubell and a small army of Habitat volunteers built the structure during a 48-hour construction blitz.

Matthew Szymanski, chairman of AIA Triangle’s Young Architects Forum committee, added his feelings about the competition: “We wanted to make ReSpace more than a contest. We wanted it to be an experience that would change people, and tying it to reuse has done that.”

Szymanski firmly believes that once designers and builders have worked with salvaged materials “they’ll be more likely to do it again and again and again.”

Joel Lubell noted another value: “The materials all have a story. They all come from somewhere. You get an idea that something came from your local area and it’s got history to it.”

The contest’s jury included North Carolina architect Ellen Weinstein, AIA, who admired the LightWall’s minimalism. “I just found it to be a simple and elegant structure in the landscape,” she said.

According to the young designers, “simple” was a necessity. Both students were extremely busy as the deadline for submissions neared, so they designed something quickly during a two-hour brainstorming session, using markers and trace paper.

“We reasoned that we didn’t have enough time before the deadline to add too many layers of complexity,” Hefner said. “Little did we know that the LightWall’s inherent simplicity would be one of its strongest traits.” The entire structure fits on a lowboy trailer for shipping anywhere in the country.

“This will be a fascinating auction,” said auctioneer Sarah Sonke. “The success will depend upon bidders’ imaginations – what wonderful purposes they see for the pavilion.”

Bidding will end at 8 p.m. on June 11. The website (http://habitatonlineauction.com) includes information on how to bid and videos of the competition and “construction blitz.”

For more information on this and future ReSpace Design Competitions, go to www.respace.org.

LightWall_board_small

Artsplosure Raleigh Kicks off May 15th & 16th

Posted in art, culture, food, North Carolina, raleigh, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on May 13, 2010 by killahfunkadelic

Once again Raleigh NC gets ready to kick off the summer season with the annual Artsplosure festival. This year the event hits the downtown Raleigh streets in the area in and around Moore Square and City Market on May 15th and 16th from 11am to 7pm.

The event attracts upwards of 80,000 people throughout the weekend and features plenty of food, live music, and over 170 juried visual artists and crafters from all over the country will have their wares for sale. The event is held rain or shine and is free to the public.

Raleigh Artists to Open ‘Studio 600’ on Glenwood South

Posted in art, raleigh with tags , , on November 4, 2009 by killahfunkadelic

craighead_structure64

Artists Jason Craighead and David Green will open Studio 600, their new working studios, to the public during Raleigh’s First Friday Art Walk, November 6, starting at 7 p.m. Studio 600 is located at 600 Glenwood South between the 606 Lounge and Abbey Carpets.

After working out of a spare bedroom-turned-studio in his downtown Raleigh apartment for several years, Craighead was seriously looking for separate space when two things came together: His friend, mixed-media artist David Green, also needed a studio, and the warehouse space behind Abbey Carpets at 600 Glenwood South became available.

“Studio 600 – which is simply named for the address – will make us more accessible to the public,” said Craighead. “It also gives us a place to create work without having to live in it. And it gives us a great place to collaborate on some work. I want to do other things, besides painting.”

Craighead and Green have up-fitted the warehouse-turned-studios themselves, with a little help from friends — framing out, dry-walling and painting the interior, and installing lighting. When Studio 600 opens to the public on November 6, the interior will feature a small entrance gallery/foyer, additional display walls beyond and to the right of that area, dedicated working space for each artist, and ample storage units.

About the entrance area, Craighead noted that he and Green do not intend to use it just to display their own work. They will invite other artists to use the space for shows and art installations.

“If you’re going to participate in the community, why just hang your own work? Participate in the community,” he said. “Let somebody else have some fun.”

He noted, however, that “shows” are only for a day and a half. Studio 600 will be open to the public each First Friday and the following Saturday. After that, all but the front area is strictly for creating art work and open otherwise only by appointment.

“This is not a gallery,” he stressed. “It’s a working studio.”

Photo Op: Raleigh Wide Open

Posted in art, culture, music, photography, raleigh with tags , , , , , on October 26, 2009 by killahfunkadelic

rwo1rwo2rwo3rwo4rwo5rwo6rwo7Thousands came out to celebrate art, music and food and a newly revitalized Fayetteville Street Mall at Saturday’s Raleigh Wide Open. Although the North Carolina State Fair was going on simultaneously on the other end of town, and rain drowned out events for a couple hours, for the most part it did not dampen— er, damper— the events which also coincided with the music of Cherry Bounce Festival.

If that wasn’t enough, Krispy Kreme also debuted its new downtown location and Wheel of Fortune drew a large crowd with local tryouts for the show. The day culminated in a fireworks display over the newly opened plaza (with some fantastic new art installations) that provides a newly opened clear view between the State Capitol and the Progress Energy Performing Arts Center on opposite ends. See more on Raleigh Wide Open by the News and Observer.

9 Months in 1.5 minutes

Posted in art, culture, life, photography with tags , , on September 9, 2009 by killahfunkadelic

Over the course of my wife’s pregnancy last fall and this spring, we decided to document the inevitable expansion of the bump into a full blown belly, and then an actual living, breathing, screaming infant. Every week we took about 5 shots standing in front of a glass door, with Sonya wearing the same outfit for the sake of continuity. 132+ shots, nine months and one delivery later, we had a stack of images that chronicled the life-changing event, seemingly so slowly at the time.

However, take those 132 shots and compile them into a timeline, add a soundtrack and you’ve got something quite compelling: the pregnancy time-lapse video. Our purpose was mostly to chronicle it for our son to someday see what his mom went through before he arrived, and to share the progress with friends and family. It was also pretty cool to watch the seasons outside change from summer to fall, then winter and finally green up again in spring. Post production was a bit more involved than I had originally intended, as the camera location drifted slightly from week to week and the shots needed to be aligned or adjusted and cropped very carefully. Should have just marked a spot on the floor after all and left a tripod up.

So this video has been sitting on YouTube (a very handy way to post and share video + bandwidth for friends and family mind you) for several months now, almost drifted out of consciousness when out of the blue I got an inquiry from a Canadian newspaper that had found the video and others like it and wanted an interview. Sure, no sweat, happy to oblige. We are mentioned briefly in the article, which is nice, and for the most part all is good.

And then the comments. Granted, some people are born to be negative all the time but some went so far as to call the videos vulgar and gross. Vulgar? REALLY? C’mon, it’s a belly. If you can’t take a bare belly or the site of a pregnant woman, then you have more serious issues at play. Seriously. Don’t ever turn on your television, NEVER leave your house and don’t even THINK about opening another magazine. Ever. But whatever you do, do NOT surf YouTube and play any video that says ‘pregnancy time-lapse’.

Clayton Visual Arts Exhibit Sept 1-30

Posted in art, culture, photography with tags , , on September 4, 2009 by killahfunkadelic
"Rusty Chains" by David Kilian

Rusty Chains by David Kilian

Clayton Visual Arts’ annual Art Faire is currently exhibiting its annual juried art competition at The Clayton Center in downtown Clayton, North Carolina. The show features works across all mediums from a wide variety of area artists, and the pieces are quite impressive.

This author was honored to have been selected for an Honorable Mention with the above photograph, Rusty Chains, shot last September on a road trip up the California Coast following the scenic California State Route 1 from San Diego to San Francisco.

The exhibit runs From Sept 1 through the 30th. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 9 am – 5 pm.

Moving Midway and the Southern Plantation

Posted in art, culture, history, raleigh with tags , , , on August 25, 2009 by killahfunkadelic
Moving Midway Plantation

Moving Midway Plantation

Moving Midway is a poignant 2008 film that chronicles the rediscovery of filmmaker Godfrey Cheshire’s ancestral past encompassing a former Southern plantation near Raleigh, North Carolina. When Cheshire returns to North Carolina from New York, he finds that urban sprawl and a shopping center is creeping up on Midway Plantation, originally built in 1848. His cousin and current owner Charlie Silver proposes a controversial move: to uproot and move the family home several miles to escape the encroaching sprawl.

In the process of learning about the history of Midway, Cheshire enlists the help of history professor Robert Hinton, himself a descendant of former slaves at the Raleigh plantation.

As the film chronicles the physical moving of the home across several miles to its new location, it simultaneously chronicles a new discovery and reconciliation of a rich history and heritage, including the new discovery of at least 100 African American cousins that Cheshire and Silver were not previously aware of.

Moving Midway will be screened this Saturday at the North Carolina Museum of Art, part of a 2-day series on The Southern Plantation Revisited, which also includes a screening of Gone With The Wind and a concert of Piedmont blues featuring Algia May Hinton, herself a Midway descendant.