Archive for raleigh

Reduce, Reuse – ReSpace: Habitat’s “LightWall Pavilion” To Be Sold at Auction

Posted in architecture, art, design, DIY, environment, North Carolina, raleigh with tags , , , , , , , on May 15, 2013 by killahfunkadelic

LWPavilion1_sm

Online bids are now being accepted on the “LightWall Pavilion,” the Grand Prize winner of the inaugural ReSpace Design Competition made entirely of salvaged materials. The Competition was sponsored by Habitat for Humanity of Wake County, the American Institute of Architects’ Triangle section, and Architecture For Humanity’s Raleigh chapter. All proceeds will benefit Habitat Wake.

On Saturday, June 1, from 9-11 a.m., AuctionFirst, the real estate bidding agency for the “LightWall,” will host a Preview Tour in the parking lot of Habitat Wake County’s ReStore’s parking lot at 2420 N. Raleigh Boulevard, Raleigh, NC 27604, where the pavilion is stored.

Scott Hefner and Abe Drechsler, two NCSU students studying Environmental Design in Architecture, designed the pavilion, which measures 18.5 feet long, 11.5 feet wide, and 11 feet tall, and is destined for a variety of uses – from a gazebo-like structure in the landscape, to an artist’s or writer’s studio, a playhouse, a meditation retreat, etc.

Materials, donated or salvaged from around Wake County, include:

  • Framing lumber salvaged by Habitat Wake’s DeConstruction program
  • Interior Maple gym flooring from Chapel Hill High School
  • Diagonal floor sheathing for exterior siding from the DeConstruction program, and manufactured siding donated to the Habitat ReStore in Raleigh
  • Weather barrier and roofing donated to the Raleigh ReStore
  • Old pallet racking from the Raleigh ReStore and reused glass bottles from various bars and restaurants in downtown Raleigh. The bottles create the “light wall” that filters sunlight and bathes the interior in colored light.

LWPavilion2_sm

Joel Lubell, a builder and volunteer at Habitat, conceived of and organized the ReSpace Competition “to raise awareness of reuse materials while showcasing creative and successful small space designs inspired by their use,” according to his website www.respace.org. Lubell and a small army of Habitat volunteers built the structure during a 48-hour construction blitz.

Matthew Szymanski, chairman of AIA Triangle’s Young Architects Forum committee, added his feelings about the competition: “We wanted to make ReSpace more than a contest. We wanted it to be an experience that would change people, and tying it to reuse has done that.”

Szymanski firmly believes that once designers and builders have worked with salvaged materials “they’ll be more likely to do it again and again and again.”

Joel Lubell noted another value: “The materials all have a story. They all come from somewhere. You get an idea that something came from your local area and it’s got history to it.”

The contest’s jury included North Carolina architect Ellen Weinstein, AIA, who admired the LightWall’s minimalism. “I just found it to be a simple and elegant structure in the landscape,” she said.

According to the young designers, “simple” was a necessity. Both students were extremely busy as the deadline for submissions neared, so they designed something quickly during a two-hour brainstorming session, using markers and trace paper.

“We reasoned that we didn’t have enough time before the deadline to add too many layers of complexity,” Hefner said. “Little did we know that the LightWall’s inherent simplicity would be one of its strongest traits.” The entire structure fits on a lowboy trailer for shipping anywhere in the country.

“This will be a fascinating auction,” said auctioneer Sarah Sonke. “The success will depend upon bidders’ imaginations – what wonderful purposes they see for the pavilion.”

Bidding will end at 8 p.m. on June 11. The website (http://habitatonlineauction.com) includes information on how to bid and videos of the competition and “construction blitz.”

For more information on this and future ReSpace Design Competitions, go to www.respace.org.

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Trailblazer’s ‘Salvage Dawgs’ goes primetime on HGTV

Posted in antiques, architecture, DIY, history, North Carolina, raleigh with tags , , , , , , on January 11, 2013 by killahfunkadelic

Salvage-Dawgs-PRnewswire

Congratulations to our friends at Raleigh’s Trailblazer Studios: their show “Salvage Dawgs,” the new reality series that premiered in November on the DIY network, has been bumped up to primetime on the higher rated sister network HGTV. The show airs Thurs., Jan 10 at 8pm and 8:30pm.

“Salvage Dawgs” chronicles the adventures and creativity of the Black Dog Salvage team – a Virginia-based architectural salvage business. Long time do-it-yourself fans and newcomers alike can enjoy salvage owners Robert Kulp and Mike Whiteside as they display their polar opposite personalities, making for a show filled with humor and suspense. While both share a passion for historical preservation, Robert is the self-proclaimed “bottom line guy” who focuses on the re-sale value. Mike is the “go big, go fast, go hard” guy who finds amusement in the unusual and engineers often hair-brained solutions for getting materials out of structures unharmed.

“We’re obviously thrilled that this move to HGTV allows us an opportunity to turn new viewers on to the show, said Jeff Lanter, co-executive producer. “At the same time, it gives our current fans more access to the series they’ve grown to love.”

From carefully extracting architectural elements from private homes and classic historical properties to disassembling old hospitals and crumbling mills, every show is a fast-paced treasure hunt.

In Thursday night’s 8pm episode, the crew salvages the Washington Mill, an old cotton mill from the late 1800s. At 8:30, they explore the six-story, luxury Robert E. Lee Hotel built in 1926 to uncover a peg leg sink, French doors and pelican urinals. They also build a coffee table out of a salvaged panel and wood from the Izard House.

“Salvage Dawgs” is co-produced by North Carolina-based film companies Trailblazer Studios and Figure 8 Films. The two companies have worked together previously on Figure 8 Film’s TLC series “Sister Wives,” “Abby and Brittany” and “Jon & Kate Plus 8.”

Black Dog Salvage is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. With a mission to reclaim, renew and redefine architectural salvage for a sustainable future, it specializes in architectural elements from turn-of-the-century to mid-century modern homes, estates and buildings.

North Carolina’s Finest Mid-Century Modern In Danger

Posted in architecture, design, history, North Carolina, raleigh with tags , , , , , on August 8, 2012 by killahfunkadelic
Paschal house

The Wright-praised Paschal house needs a buyer to see another 62 years.

One of the most highly praised mid-century Modern houses in North Carolina, the 1950 Paschal house, is threatened with eventual teardown if a buyer doesn’t come forward very soon.

Award-winning Raleigh architect Frank Harmon, FAIA, said recently, “I personally think this is, flat out, the greatest modern house in North Carolina.” According to Harmon, the late Harwell Hamilton Harris, FAIA, shared his sentiment. Even Frank Lloyd Wright observed after visiting the house “it does the cause [of modern architecture] good.”

“We’re putting out a national preservation alert to save this James Fitzgibbon-designed icon,” said George Smart, founder and director of Triangle Modernist Houses, (TMH) an award-winning, non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design.

Paschal house

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house has been empty and on the market for five years.

The owners, the three Paschal heirs who are now in their sixties, are asking $3.3 million for the 3300-square-foot house on three acres in Raleigh’s Country Club Hills.

“In these difficult economic times, that’s an unrealistic price,” Smart said.

Experts, such as Frank Harmon, believe the house is no where near “too far gone,” as some have suggested.

“The house could certainly be restored and heat and air conditioning installed while honoring Fitzgibbon’s design,” Harmon said. (The radiant heat in the floors hasn’t worked for years, and the house doesn’t have air conditioning; its sustainable design made cooling optional.) “I’ve been through the house on many occasions and it can definitely be saved.”

According to Preservation North Carolina’s Executive Director, Myrick Howard, the 62-year-old house is eligible for historic preservation tax credits if it is restored.

Marvin Malecha, FAIA, Dean of N.C. State University’s College of Design and a former president of the American Institute of Architects, told the News & Observer that the Paschal House “is still considered an iconic piece of architecture.”

A real danger exists, however, that the house will deteriorate past the point of no return and require demolition, following the fate of the 1954 Eduardo Catalano House, similarly vacant and eventually demolished despite praise by Frank Lloyd Wright and being named the “House of the Decade” by House and Home Magazine.

House and Architect: Ahead of Their Time

Comprised of granite, wood, and glass, the one-story Paschal house features a sweeping flat roof, extensive floor-to-ceiling windows, a floor-to-ceiling fireplace and sunken hearth, built-in bookcases and storage, intimate atria at each end, and Wrightian-inspired gates.

The house embraced sustainability 40 years ahead of the times. Despite its lack of air conditioning, it was reportedly cool in the summer. The windows provide an abundance of natural light and ventilation, deep roof overhangs shade the windows from the hot summer, and cork flooring is a sustainable building material.

The architect, James Fitzgibbon (1915-1985), moved to Raleigh with other members of the first faculty of the NC State University School of Design, hand-picked by the founding dean, Henry Kamphoefner. Fitzgibbon enjoyed a long partnership with R. Buckminster Fuller and his work was once featured in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, placed between that of Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Kahn.

Paschal house

For more information on the Paschal House, go to www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/fitzgibbon.htm and see Preservation NC’s listing at www.presnc.org (click on “Buy Property” then “Historic Properties for sale”).

Thirst4Architecture: Happy Hour Launches for Design Businesses, Enthusiasts

Posted in architecture, design, raleigh with tags , , on April 7, 2011 by killahfunkadelic

Raleigh NCFollowing the popularity of its Appetite4Architecture dinners that connect the public with local Modernist architects, Triangle Modernist Houses (TMH) will launch the first Thirst4Architecture (T4A) happy hour in partnership with GoodnightRaleigh.com. The happy hour will take place on April 27 at Natty Greene’s Pub & Brewing Company in Raleigh from 6-8 p.m.  The informal, cash-bar event is free and open to the public. No pre-registration is required.

TMH is dedicated to preserving and promoting modernist residential design. Co-host Goodnight, Raleigh! is a popular online magazine run by 11 photographers, updated with images of the city at night and stories on the subjects of the photographs. Publisher John Morris is best known recently by his campaign to save the Milton Small-designed bookstore at N.C. State University.

“Our film series and dinner events in the winter have connected hundreds of people within the architecture-loving public,” said TMH founder and director George Smart. “Our T4A events will bring together the larger design community around some of the area’s great restaurants and brewpubs.

“We welcome architects, artists, designers, interior designers, realtors, engineers, contractors, property investors, building managers, Modernist homeowners, materials and furnishings dealers, and anyone with a huge crush on great architecture,” Smart said.

Smart hopes the bi-monthly happy hours, held around the Triangle, will continue building relationships, generating passion about good design, creating strategic alliances, and connecting people around Modernist architecture.

Crabtree Creek Timelapse

Posted in environment, North Carolina, photography, raleigh with tags , , , , on April 4, 2011 by killahfunkadelic

I recently discovered this beautiful time lapse video compiled by Raleigh photographer Forrest MacCormack. An entire video compiled of stills shot at 1 second intervals– Forrest captures some gorgeous scenes that offer a fresh take around Raleigh’s Crabtree Creek, Lassiter Mills falls, and the Neuse River. Check it out.

UPDATE: Here are Forrest’s notes on shooting and editing the video— check out Forrest’s blog here.

Forbes Ranks Raleigh Third ‘Most Innovative’ City

Posted in culture, North Carolina, photography, raleigh, Uncategorized with tags , , , on May 26, 2010 by killahfunkadelic

Raleigh Ranked #3 Innovative City in USAnother day, and another top ten ranking for the City of Raleigh. A couple days ago portfolio.com declared Raleigh North Carolina as the #1 quality of life among top metro areas. The next day Forbes top 10 list of the America’s Most Innovative Cities, and Raleigh places a respectable third.

The ranking is based on the top 100 US metro areas, taking into account factors including ratios of high tech, scientific and creative jobs, patents per capita, and venture capital. San Jose was given the top honor in this list.

And once again Forbes sourced of one of KCG Art Director David Kilian’s Raleigh skyline photos for their article. Thanks, Forbes!